What to do when the weather doesn’t co-operate?

We have all been there – we travel to some location, perhaps on vacation, and then the weather isn’t really that good for photography. Do you still take your photos and then what do you do with them on your return? I recently went to New York City for a couple of days and although it was generally dry and a partially sunny, we took a trip to Staten Island on the (free) ferry past the Statue of Liberty and then back to Manhattan. I’ll get onto what I took shortly, but my ideas for processing developed when I saw that this:

had earned over $400 since I uploaded it – far more than any of the similar images that have the normal pretty glum water in front of the city. Admittedly, most of those sales were from iStock and Getty, but I’m still not complaining! So back to New York. This is what my image looked like out of the camera: Continue Reading

Canva – what sells there?

This has been a tricky question to answer as the website does give a list of all images sold in date order, but it doesn’t show a thumbnail of the sold image. There is a tampermonkey script (search Canva tampermonkey on the Microstock Group forum to find details) that shows those thumbnails against each sale, but even then you are just eyeballing a long list of sales. However, Microstockr Pro has now added the agency to their list of supported agencies and so we can see what is selling on a daily basis and can also use the best seller function to see which images sell most frequently. Here is my best seller snapshot:

What is interesting about this is that my best selling images are almost all isolations. I’ll talk about that in a minute, but any thumbnail on here that has a dark grey background is actually a PNG file with the white background totally removed and transparent pixels there instead. So the designer using the Canva app can simply drag one of these images onto their design and simply add the object with no extra work. Continue Reading

Earnings from Stock Photography in May 2018

No clickbait headlines from me this month! However, the earnings were probably worthy of a headline like that. Certainly not as good as April with its $3500 total, but certainly better than May 2017 with a total of $2954:

Earnings from selling photos online

What is very nice to see is the continuing trend (which started last August) of the current earnings being higher, in some cases much higher, than the trend had been in the same month in previous years. This month was no exception, with earnings coming in about $500 (or 20%) higher than any of the previous years. Yes, I have added more images and video, but I had also done that in previous years, so it is very nice to see some reward for my efforts.

I traveled to England for almost 3 weeks this month and so didn’t upload much that made any difference to the downloads, but it certainly gave me a lot of work on my return.  Continue Reading

Interesting new feature on Microstockr Pro

You may already have seen this, but I had been talking to the developers of Microstockr Pro with ideas for new features and asked for the ability to be able to sort the images in the download section to show images ranked by the sale value rather than just by the date of the sale. My idea was that if you have been away for a few weeks, it would be good to look back at the higher selling images rather than have to go through page after page of subscription sales. They have come up with a neat way of doing that – you can put financial filters in the search box to show you images equal to a value, above a value or below a value. For example, putting <0.05 in the search box shows me the “sales” that have occurred on iStock with a value of less than 5c:

Sales for less than 5c on iStock

The good news is that $0.01 is the lowest price iStock are allowing on their site!!! Ignoring the big debate about how much an image is worth, this new Microstockr Pro feature is very nicely implemented. Thanks, guys!

This photographer decided to sell his photos – the results will amaze you!

OK – sorry for the clickbait title. I always avoid clicking on posts like this, but I guess some people must click on them otherwise we wouldn’t see them everywhere! However, the results this month will amaze you – at least I was pretty pleased with them! Historically, April has marked the start of the down months for my stock earnings – a slump that lasts until August. But this month has knocked that tradition out of the ballpark with an overall earnings total of $3460. My best result ever for monthly sales. Here is the chart:

Almost $1000 more than in April 2017. That has maintained the steady growth pattern that started around last August and has been generating best month after best month ever since. Continue Reading

Did my junk shop typewriter earn its keep?

Back in February, I wrote about the ideas you can sometimes get from objects in a junk shop – specifically a typewriter which cost me $15. I was asked to report on success – did it pay it’s way? After 2 months of sales, I can report that it did!

Total earnings from the typewriter shots now that my iStock results are available are $47 – so a solid $32 profit! I must admit that the sale that pushed it well into positive territory was actually a video from Adobe Stock for $28 a few days ago. So there is another tip – when you have bought your object from the junk shop, take both still photos and video clips of it!

Stock Video – Part 3. How I do it…

The earlier posts on this subject have covered the basics of what stock video is, and then more detail on the sort of clips I have been producing. Now I’ll focus on some details about how I go about getting the clips taken, edited and uploaded to the five agencies I support: Shutterstock, Adobe Stock, Pond5, Storyblocks and iStock.

The first step obviously starts in the camera. I’ve been choosing to shoot in the PAL standard of 23.98. There are many debates about this, some saying that the 30 fps normally used for US television allows you to downscale to the European version if needed, but others point out that movies and high end commercials are normally shot at 24 fps as well. I’m not sure it matters! Continue Reading

Difficult to find the time to start in Stock Photography?

A friend with a deep portfolio on images on his hard drive recently asked me if I had any advice on breaking through the barrier of “just too much to do and not enough time” to get started in selling these images on the various stock agencies. Often, being faced with keywording and describing hundreds or thousands of images, we tend to just put it off for another day! After all, this part of the process is the most difficult for many photographers – they love taking photos and processing them to get a perfect image to share, but then add in the 40 keywords and description etc. and the enthusiasm fades rapidly! I’m not saying it is as simple as ABC, but how hard would it be?

So how could you handle this? The first is to see if you could outsource some of those functions – particularly keywording. Continue Reading

Quick tip – how to remove sun flare

I’m still working through all my images from Spain and Italy and just processed one that made me thing that it would make a good quick tip if you come across the same conditions. I was at an overlook over a square in Rome and the sun was straight ahead and directly in my field of vision. It was late in the afternoon and the shadows in the square would make for an interesting shot and so I wanted to capture it:

The technique I used to get this is really easy – no lens hood is going to help you (in fact, I never take lens hoods with me these days as they interfere when I want a polarizing filter on the lens). The trick is to Continue Reading

One of the good days

Today is one of those days that only comes round very rarely. Once in a blue moon as my parents used to say. Total sales for the day are a cool $200. Why? Three very nice sizeable sales!

First Shutterstock with a pretty boring shot I took in the English Lake District on a cloudy day for $69.81:

Hardly a fine art print, I’m afraid! But then Alamy came in with a sale at $89 gross which netted me $44.50 Continue Reading

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